Tourism

FILE - Elvis impersonator Brendan Paul, right, walks down the aisle during a wedding ceremony for Katie Salvatore, center, and Eric Wheeler at the Graceland Wedding Chapel in Las Vegas. Authentic Brands Group (ABG) sent cease-and-desist letters earlier this month to multiple chapels, saying they had to comply by the end of May, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Company to Las Vegas chapels: No more Elvis-themed weddings

Authentic Brands Group sent cease-and-desist letters in early May to multiple chapels

 

Eldo Enns rides his penny farthing bicycle in Dawson City, Yukon, on Friday June 19, 2009. Yukon’s tourism industry is abuzz with anticipation as Canada’s northernmost border opens June 1 for the first time since the pandemic began, says the executive director of the Klondike Visitors Association in Dawson City.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canada’s most northern border to reopen June 1, Yukon prepares for return of tourism

Americans typically make up most of the territory’s tourists

 

Guide Eli Schellenberg, in red, leads climbers down from the summit of the Mt. Norquay Via Ferrata near Banff, Alta., Thursday, June 20, 2019. Even as gas prices hit record highs, Canadians are fanning out across the country for fresh travel experiences after two years of bottled-up demand. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Canadians hold their noses at gas prices as they hit the road, skies once again

Some tourism operators expected to double down on domestic markets

 

Jeffrey Hansen-Carlson, president of Prairie Sky Gondola, is pictured at the location for a proposed urban gondola in Edmonton on Friday, April 29, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Cities in Western Canada consider gondolas as part of transit, tourism plans

Projects a way to move people across waterways or get tourists up mountainsides

Jeffrey Hansen-Carlson, president of Prairie Sky Gondola, is pictured at the location for a proposed urban gondola in Edmonton on Friday, April 29, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
B.C. hopes to attract marquee events and conferences to boost the tourism economy. (File photo)

B.C. announces further supports to revitalize tourism economy

Funding aimed at attracting events, conferences and training workers

B.C. hopes to attract marquee events and conferences to boost the tourism economy. (File photo)
(Canadian Press photo)

Travel, tourism sectors see glimmers of hope amid Omicron uncertainty

Many Canadians second-guessing their travel plans as information trickles out about Omicron

(Canadian Press photo)
Skiers stands at the top of Big White ski resort in Kelowna, B.C., Friday, Jan. 26, 2007. Canadian ski resorts, including Big White, that rely on Canada’s backlogged visa approval service are facing a labour shortage this season. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jacques Boissinot

Canadian ski resorts face labour shortage, government slow to issue working visas

“We’ll start panicking around Nov. 1 if nothing changes because there’s just not enough Canadians…”

Skiers stands at the top of Big White ski resort in Kelowna, B.C., Friday, Jan. 26, 2007. Canadian ski resorts, including Big White, that rely on Canada’s backlogged visa approval service are facing a labour shortage this season. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jacques Boissinot
One of four totem poles on the corners of a bridge over the Nass River to Gitwinksihlkw (Canyon City) in northwestern British Columbia is seen on Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018. The Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada is making a bleak prediction about its members’ ability to rapidly recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin Perkel

Pandemic recovery for Indigenous tourism will be slow, says report

Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada projects an overall 54 per cent decline since the pandemic

One of four totem poles on the corners of a bridge over the Nass River to Gitwinksihlkw (Canyon City) in northwestern British Columbia is seen on Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018. The Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada is making a bleak prediction about its members’ ability to rapidly recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin Perkel
Stephane Prevost, a Banff restaurateur, poses in this handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO

Tourism destinations brace for busy winter without usual supply of foreign workers

Uncertainty around COVID-19 has kept some potential resort staffers from moving to Canada

Stephane Prevost, a Banff restaurateur, poses in this handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO
The Alberta Prairie Railway brings history to life

Living history and outdoor adventures await in Stettler (+ great eats and shopping, too!)

This unique little big town brings the past to life

  • Aug 9, 2021
The Alberta Prairie Railway brings history to life
Canadian flags are seen on the Office of the Prime Minister and Privy Council as tourists take photos on Parliament Hill before Canada Day, in Ottawa on June 27, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Feds launch tourism fund to help tourism businesses avoid spiral of debt, Joly says

Even as restrictions ease, Minister Mélanie Joly says tourism operators feel some anxiety

Canadian flags are seen on the Office of the Prime Minister and Privy Council as tourists take photos on Parliament Hill before Canada Day, in Ottawa on June 27, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
The empty streets of Banff are seen as Parks Canada is restricting vehicles in the national parks and national historic sites due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in Banff, Alta., Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Even as Alberta plans to drop nearly all COVID-19 restrictions on July 1st, local businesses and the Banff National Park’s tourism board say they’ll be sorely missing international tourists for a second peak summer season in a row. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Banff is packed, but lack of international visitors leaves many businesses struggling

Real change for the sector will come only when borders are opened

The empty streets of Banff are seen as Parks Canada is restricting vehicles in the national parks and national historic sites due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in Banff, Alta., Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Even as Alberta plans to drop nearly all COVID-19 restrictions on July 1st, local businesses and the Banff National Park’s tourism board say they’ll be sorely missing international tourists for a second peak summer season in a row. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Health-care workers wait for airline passengers at a COVID-19 testing centre at Trudeau Airport in Montreal, Friday, Feb. 19, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Travel quarantine rules set to ease for fully vaxed Canadians, permanent residents

Business groups welcomed the proposed change, still calling for a clear restart plan

Health-care workers wait for airline passengers at a COVID-19 testing centre at Trudeau Airport in Montreal, Friday, Feb. 19, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
People wearing face masks to protect against the spread of coronavirus walk along a comercial street in downtown Madrid, Spain, Saturday, June 5, 2021. Coronavirus infections, hospitalizations and deaths are plummeting across much of Europe. Vaccination rates are accelerating, and with them, the promise of summer vacations. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

To the beach! Spain opens borders to tourists, cruise ships

Spanish government hopes to welcome 14.5 million to 15.5 million visitors between July and September

People wearing face masks to protect against the spread of coronavirus walk along a comercial street in downtown Madrid, Spain, Saturday, June 5, 2021. Coronavirus infections, hospitalizations and deaths are plummeting across much of Europe. Vaccination rates are accelerating, and with them, the promise of summer vacations. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau walks between buildings in the Parliamentary precinct in Ottawa on Friday May 28, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Trudeau says government looking at plan for return of international tourists

Anyone coming to Canada would need to be fully vaccinated before arriving, PM said

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau walks between buildings in the Parliamentary precinct in Ottawa on Friday May 28, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
People look on as the Norwegian Bliss en route from Alaska to Seattle makes it’s way towards Ogden Point, in Victoria, B.C., Friday, June 1, 2018. The CEO of the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority said he tried to alert Canadian and B.C. politicians to the ramifications of the change that would temporarily allow international cruise ships to bypass B.C. ports. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

U.S. cruise law puts B.C. economic impacts at risk: Harbour authority

CEO of the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority worries about a temporary measure becoming permanent

People look on as the Norwegian Bliss en route from Alaska to Seattle makes it’s way towards Ogden Point, in Victoria, B.C., Friday, June 1, 2018. The CEO of the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority said he tried to alert Canadian and B.C. politicians to the ramifications of the change that would temporarily allow international cruise ships to bypass B.C. ports. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
FILE - In this Wednesday, July 1, 2020 file photo, Marcel Schmetz raises the US flag next to a WWII American Sherman tank at his Remember Museum 39-45 in Thimister-Clermont, Belgium. Tourists from the United States who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 could be able to travel across the European Union this summer, officials from the 27-nation bloc said on Monday, April 26, 2021. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)

EU finalizing plans to allow U.S. tourists back this summer

The commission didn’t say when exactly tourists will be allowed back inside the bloc

FILE - In this Wednesday, July 1, 2020 file photo, Marcel Schmetz raises the US flag next to a WWII American Sherman tank at his Remember Museum 39-45 in Thimister-Clermont, Belgium. Tourists from the United States who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 could be able to travel across the European Union this summer, officials from the 27-nation bloc said on Monday, April 26, 2021. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
Stephane Prevost, a Banff restaurateur, poses in this handout photo. Prevost says the third lockdown comes at a particularly difficult time when he’d usually be preparing to ramp up his staffing and work. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO

Staff up now, or stay lean and wait? Hospitality sector faces dilemma amid third wave

Some are still optimistic for the longer-term, and say Canadians have amassed cash during the pandemic

Stephane Prevost, a Banff restaurateur, poses in this handout photo. Prevost says the third lockdown comes at a particularly difficult time when he’d usually be preparing to ramp up his staffing and work. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO
The green waters of Moraine Lake are pictured in Lake Louise, Alberta, June, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
The green waters of Moraine Lake are pictured in Lake Louise, Alberta, June, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A pedestrian walks along a deserted street in Old Montreal, Wednesday, November 18, 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact tourism and the hospitality industry. Tourism spending in Canada dropped by 2 per cent in the fourth quarter of 2020, Statistics Canada says, capping off a disastrous year for the domestic tourism industry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Canadian tourism sector shrank by nearly half in 2020 as COVID-19 ravages industry

Statistics Canada says tourism jobs fell 28.7 per cent in 2020

A pedestrian walks along a deserted street in Old Montreal, Wednesday, November 18, 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact tourism and the hospitality industry. Tourism spending in Canada dropped by 2 per cent in the fourth quarter of 2020, Statistics Canada says, capping off a disastrous year for the domestic tourism industry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz