domestic violence

A man leaves the Kamloops Law Courts building, in Kamloops, BC on Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2009. A family court pilot project in British Columbia may be a promising solution for domestic violence victims trying to navigate a confusing and intimidating legal system, advocates say. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Daniel Hayduk

B.C. informal family court promising for domestic violence victims: advocates

Informal trial doesn’t involve lawyers, let’s each side personally explain their stance

 

Actor Johnny Depp arrives in the courtroom for closing arguments at the Fairfax County Circuit Courthouse in Fairfax, Va., Friday, May 27, 2022. Depp sued his ex-wife Amber Heard for libel in Fairfax County Circuit Court after she wrote an op-ed piece in The Washington Post in 2018 referring to herself as a “public figure representing domestic abuse.” (AP Photo/Steve Helber, Pool)

At long last, jury gets closing arguments in Depp trial

Johnny Depp’s lawyers asked a jury Friday “to give Mr. Depp his…

 

Marco Mendicino, Minister of Public Safety, speaks during an announcement regarding the Government of Canada’s ongoing efforts to protect Canadians from the threat of gun violence during a press conference in Ottawa on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Women’s groups warn Liberals against ‘downloading’ gun control to potential victims

Concerns about ‘red flag provision’ raised as government prepares new gun-control legislation

 

Irina Petrakova, a survivor of domestic violence, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in her flat in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021. Petrakova, 41, suffered years of abuse at the hands of her husband. She said that even when they were finally divorced, he was able to assault her outside the courthouse where she brought a case against him. “Had the law been in force, had I had a (restraining) order, he wouldn’t have been able to even approach me,” said Petrakova, whose case is before the European Court of Human Rights. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

European court urges Russia to tackle its domestic violence problem

Human Rights court says violence against women is happening on a ‘staggering scale’ in Russia

Irina Petrakova, a survivor of domestic violence, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in her flat in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021. Petrakova, 41, suffered years of abuse at the hands of her husband. She said that even when they were finally divorced, he was able to assault her outside the courthouse where she brought a case against him. “Had the law been in force, had I had a (restraining) order, he wouldn’t have been able to even approach me,” said Petrakova, whose case is before the European Court of Human Rights. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
People look on as beams of light are projected into the air in Montreal, Sunday, Dec. 6, 2020, in memory of the fourteen women who were murdered on December 6,1989, in an anti-feminist attack. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Polytechnique anniversary comes as Quebec mourns spate of domestic violence killings

Quebec has experienced a spate of femicides since the beginning of 2021

People look on as beams of light are projected into the air in Montreal, Sunday, Dec. 6, 2020, in memory of the fourteen women who were murdered on December 6,1989, in an anti-feminist attack. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
Marci Ien, the Liberal Candidate for the Toronto Centre riding, is pictured as she canvases on Thursday October 22, 2020, ahead of Monday’s by-election. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

New women’s minister will focus on men in order to combat gender-based violence

Minister Marci Ien says part of the eqution is figuring out the root causes of the problem

Marci Ien, the Liberal Candidate for the Toronto Centre riding, is pictured as she canvases on Thursday October 22, 2020, ahead of Monday’s by-election. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
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2 police watchdogs now mandated to probe domestic violence, experts say more needed

‘It’s a virtually unknown area, and the few stats or reports … we can only really scratch the surface of this’

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Alberta’s provincial flag flies in Ottawa, Monday, July 6, 2020. Alberta is the second province to bring in a law that could help people at risk of domestic violence learn about an intimate partner’s criminal record. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Alberta brings in Clare’s Law to allow access to intimate partner’s violent history

The law originated in the U.K. and is named after Clare Wood, a woman who was murdered in 2009 by a partner

Alberta’s provincial flag flies in Ottawa, Monday, July 6, 2020. Alberta is the second province to bring in a law that could help people at risk of domestic violence learn about an intimate partner’s criminal record. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
People participate in the annual Women’s Memorial March in Vancouver, B.C., Sunday, Feb. 14, 2021. The second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic did not stop a rising tide of reports of domestic violence, experts say, warning that the stress of life in lockdown continues to put victims at risk. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Reports of domestic, intimate partner violence continue to rise during pandemic

Call volumes spiked almost immediately when swaths of Canada first locked down

People participate in the annual Women’s Memorial March in Vancouver, B.C., Sunday, Feb. 14, 2021. The second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic did not stop a rising tide of reports of domestic violence, experts say, warning that the stress of life in lockdown continues to put victims at risk. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
A staff member carries bedding in one of the suites at Toronto’s Interval House, an emergency shelter for women in abusive situations, on Monday February 6, 2017. A new national survey by Women’s Shelters Canada offers a glimpse into the experiences of front-line workers and women fleeing violence during the COVID-19 pandemic, with reports of clients facing more violence that is also increasing in severity. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Canada-wide survey of women’s shelters shows abuse more severe during pandemic

Shelters also noted an increase and escalation in physical violence

A staff member carries bedding in one of the suites at Toronto’s Interval House, an emergency shelter for women in abusive situations, on Monday February 6, 2017. A new national survey by Women’s Shelters Canada offers a glimpse into the experiences of front-line workers and women fleeing violence during the COVID-19 pandemic, with reports of clients facing more violence that is also increasing in severity. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
Angela Marie MacDougall, executive director of Battered Women’s Support Services, poses for a photograph in Vancouver, on Tuesday, October 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

‘It’s like a pressure cooker in the house:’ Calls to helplines in Canada jump in pandemic

Calls tripled in the spring in B.C. before levelling off in the summer

Angela Marie MacDougall, executive director of Battered Women’s Support Services, poses for a photograph in Vancouver, on Tuesday, October 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development Maryam Monsef arrives on Parliament Hill during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa on Wednesday, May 20, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Feds double COVID-19 fund for abused women to $100 million

Data shows that one in 10 women is very or extremely concerned about possibility of violence during pandemic

Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development Maryam Monsef arrives on Parliament Hill during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa on Wednesday, May 20, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick