Coronavirus

A person receives a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

B.C. COVID-19 vaccine card system takes effect, one dose required in many settings

Card not required at grocery and liquor stores, pharmacies, retail stores, and more

A person receives a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
An ambulance passes through a crowd of people protesting COVID-19 vaccine passports and mandatory vaccinations for healthcare workers, in Vancouver, B.C., Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Politicians issue warnings ahead of hospital protests expected across Canada

Ontario medical professionals issue joint statement “strongly condemning” the planned disruptions

An ambulance passes through a crowd of people protesting COVID-19 vaccine passports and mandatory vaccinations for healthcare workers, in Vancouver, B.C., Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Cincinnati Bengals fans cheer during the first half of an NFL football game against the Minnesota Vikings, Sunday, Sept. 12, 2021, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Jeff Dean)

Tailgating, face-painted fans back in force at U.S. NFL stadiums

Vaccination rates and mask rules vary across the country

Cincinnati Bengals fans cheer during the first half of an NFL football game against the Minnesota Vikings, Sunday, Sept. 12, 2021, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Jeff Dean)
Director Denis Villeneuve and actor Javier Bardem are shown on the set of the Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures’ action “Dune,” in a handout photo. The Montreal writer-director has made headlines lately for trumpeting the importance of the cinematic experience and saying he hopes audiences will watch his sci-fi epic “Dune” in theatres. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.-Chiabella James **MANDATORY CREDIT**
Director Denis Villeneuve and actor Javier Bardem are shown on the set of the Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures’ action “Dune,” in a handout photo. The Montreal writer-director has made headlines lately for trumpeting the importance of the cinematic experience and saying he hopes audiences will watch his sci-fi epic “Dune” in theatres. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.-Chiabella James **MANDATORY CREDIT**
The City of Red Deer now has 495 active COVID-19 cases. (Advocate file image)
The City of Red Deer now has 495 active COVID-19 cases. (Advocate file image)
Barbara Violo, pharmacist and owner of The Junction Chemist Pharmacy, draws up a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, in Toronto, Friday, June 18, 2021. A national advisory panel recommends people who are immunocompromised to receive a third vaccine dose against COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Immunization panel says immunocompromised should receive 3rd COVID-19 vaccine dose

Immunocompromised stand a greater risk of complications and longer infections

Barbara Violo, pharmacist and owner of The Junction Chemist Pharmacy, draws up a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, in Toronto, Friday, June 18, 2021. A national advisory panel recommends people who are immunocompromised to receive a third vaccine dose against COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry looks on as Health Minister Adrian Dix speaks during a news conference at the legislature in Victoria, Monday, Aug. 23, 2021. Dix admonished those who refuse to get vaccinated against COVID-19 and have staged protests against the province’s vaccine passport plan, saying it’s both foolish to refuse a vaccination and disrespectful to protest and potentially interfere with the care of hospital patients. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Refusing COVID-19 vaccine hurts wider population, B.C. health minister says

Dix: Rejecting the facts, the data, the evidence and science only hurts us all

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry looks on as Health Minister Adrian Dix speaks during a news conference at the legislature in Victoria, Monday, Aug. 23, 2021. Dix admonished those who refuse to get vaccinated against COVID-19 and have staged protests against the province’s vaccine passport plan, saying it’s both foolish to refuse a vaccination and disrespectful to protest and potentially interfere with the care of hospital patients. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
In this photo provided by the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service, U.S. Army Capt. Corrine Brown, a critical care nurse, administers an anti-viral medication to a COVID-19 positive patient at Kootenai Health regional medical center during response operations in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, on Sept. 6, 2021. Roughly 11,000 kids in Coeur d’Alene were getting ready for their first day of school when Idaho public health officials announced this week that northern hospitals were so crowded with coronavirus patients that they would be allowed to ration health care. Kootenai Health has had to move some patients into a conference room and get help from the military to deal with the flood of coronavirus patients. (Michael H. Lehman/DVIDS U.S. Navy/via AP)

School outbreaks could buckle hospitals in COVID-slammed Idaho

Border state’s vaccination rates among lowest in the U.S., cases grew by 44% in past two weeks

In this photo provided by the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service, U.S. Army Capt. Corrine Brown, a critical care nurse, administers an anti-viral medication to a COVID-19 positive patient at Kootenai Health regional medical center during response operations in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, on Sept. 6, 2021. Roughly 11,000 kids in Coeur d’Alene were getting ready for their first day of school when Idaho public health officials announced this week that northern hospitals were so crowded with coronavirus patients that they would be allowed to ration health care. Kootenai Health has had to move some patients into a conference room and get help from the military to deal with the flood of coronavirus patients. (Michael H. Lehman/DVIDS U.S. Navy/via AP)
A nurse attends to a patient in the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at Surrey Memorial Hospital in Surrey, B.C., Friday, June 4, 2021. The average cost of treating a COVID-19 patient who needs intensive care in Canada is estimated at over $50,000 compared with $8,400 for someone who’s had a heart attack, a new report says. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Report: intensive care COVID treatment costs more than 5 times heart attack treatment

Canadian COVID patients in the ICU stay for a long time and require a lot of treatment

A nurse attends to a patient in the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at Surrey Memorial Hospital in Surrey, B.C., Friday, June 4, 2021. The average cost of treating a COVID-19 patient who needs intensive care in Canada is estimated at over $50,000 compared with $8,400 for someone who’s had a heart attack, a new report says. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
The Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary, Alta., is seen on Wednesday, April 1, 2020, amid a worldwide COVID-19 pandemic. Alberta’s health-care system is on the verge of collapse, warns a group of physicians who are pleading with the government to strengthen public health measures to fend off a relentless fourth wave of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

‘Boiling point’: Alberta doctors warn of health system collapse as COVID cases climb

Intensive care unit capacity at a seven-day average of 91 per cent

The Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary, Alta., is seen on Wednesday, April 1, 2020, amid a worldwide COVID-19 pandemic. Alberta’s health-care system is on the verge of collapse, warns a group of physicians who are pleading with the government to strengthen public health measures to fend off a relentless fourth wave of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Surrey firefighter Justin Sayson administers a first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to a man at a walk-up vaccination clinic at Bear Creek Park, in Surrey, B.C., on May 17, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccine card system good first step, medical group says

Doctors of B.C. presidents says passport system highlights how vaccinations are reducing infections

Surrey firefighter Justin Sayson administers a first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to a man at a walk-up vaccination clinic at Bear Creek Park, in Surrey, B.C., on May 17, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
A basket of needles containing Pfizer-BioNtech COVID-19 vaccine waits to be administered to patients at a COVID-19 clinic in Ottawa on Tuesday, March 30, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

‘Gentleman in Texas’ inundated with calls from Ontarians registering for COVID shots

A spokeswoman for Lambton Public Health says a news release issued had a wrong phone number

A basket of needles containing Pfizer-BioNtech COVID-19 vaccine waits to be administered to patients at a COVID-19 clinic in Ottawa on Tuesday, March 30, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021 file photo, a health worker prepares Pfizer vaccines during the national COVID-19 vaccination campaign in Pamplona, northern Spain. In a statement Monday Sept. 6, 2021, the European Medicines Agency says it has started an expedited evaluation on whether to recommend a booster dose of the coronavirus vaccine made by Pfizer-BioNTech. (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos, File)

WHO chief urges halt to booster shots for rest of the year

World Health Organization Director-General says world’s poor should not be satisfied with leftovers

FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021 file photo, a health worker prepares Pfizer vaccines during the national COVID-19 vaccination campaign in Pamplona, northern Spain. In a statement Monday Sept. 6, 2021, the European Medicines Agency says it has started an expedited evaluation on whether to recommend a booster dose of the coronavirus vaccine made by Pfizer-BioNTech. (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos, File)
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, left, and Calgary mayor Naheed Nenshi, centre right, ride in the Calgary Stampede parade in Calgary, Alta., Friday, July 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Twelve Alberta mayors call for province to implement COVID-19 vaccine passport

Premier Jason Kenney has said Alberta won’t bring in provincewide rules

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, left, and Calgary mayor Naheed Nenshi, centre right, ride in the Calgary Stampede parade in Calgary, Alta., Friday, July 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
A woman prays in front of the Herron seniors residence Monday April 13, 2020 in Dorval near Montreal's Trudeau airport. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Coroner’s inquest begins into Montreal-area care home where dozens died of COVID-19

Inquest to ‘shed a light’ on the 47 deaths that occurred at Résidence Herron

A woman prays in front of the Herron seniors residence Monday April 13, 2020 in Dorval near Montreal's Trudeau airport. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
FILE - This Jan. 29, 2021, file photo shows the packaging and a container of veterinary ivermectin in Johannesburg, South Africa. Ivermectin, which is produced by a number of drugmakers in various countries, has been used throughout the world for decades to treat infections of parasites in humans and some large animals. Health experts and medical groups are pushing to stamp out the growing use of the drug to treat COVID-19, warning that it can cause harmful side effects and there’s little evidence it helps. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell, File)

Efforts grow to stamp out use of parasite drug for COVID-19

U.S. health officials have seen a surge in prescriptions this summer

FILE - This Jan. 29, 2021, file photo shows the packaging and a container of veterinary ivermectin in Johannesburg, South Africa. Ivermectin, which is produced by a number of drugmakers in various countries, has been used throughout the world for decades to treat infections of parasites in humans and some large animals. Health experts and medical groups are pushing to stamp out the growing use of the drug to treat COVID-19, warning that it can cause harmful side effects and there’s little evidence it helps. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell, File)
A family visits across the U.S.-Canada border at the Peace Arch Historical State Park as a cyclist rides past on the Canadian side, Monday, Aug. 9, 2021, in Blaine, Wash. A month after easing border restrictions for American citizens, Canada is following suit for other international travellers. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Feds ease travel restrictions for fully vaccinated foreign nationals

Latest wave of vaccinated visitors to Canada expected to be arriving primarily by air

A family visits across the U.S.-Canada border at the Peace Arch Historical State Park as a cyclist rides past on the Canadian side, Monday, Aug. 9, 2021, in Blaine, Wash. A month after easing border restrictions for American citizens, Canada is following suit for other international travellers. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
A diner at Bartaco uses their app to order an item off the menu, at the restaurant in Arlington, Va., on Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021. The restaurant is using an automated app for ordering and payments. Instead of servers they use “food runners” to get the food to the tables. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Do we need humans for that job? Automation booms after COVID

Ideally, automation can redeploy workers into better and more interesting work

A diner at Bartaco uses their app to order an item off the menu, at the restaurant in Arlington, Va., on Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021. The restaurant is using an automated app for ordering and payments. Instead of servers they use “food runners” to get the food to the tables. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam listens to a question during a news conference, in Ottawa, Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2020. Canada’s chief public health officer says there is an urgent need for more people between 18 and 39 to get vaccinated against COVID-19 to reduce the impact of the Delta variant. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Canada could see above 15K daily COVID-19 cases by October: PHAC

It is critical to get 80 per cent of all eligible Canadians fully vaccinated as soon as possible: Tam

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam listens to a question during a news conference, in Ottawa, Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2020. Canada’s chief public health officer says there is an urgent need for more people between 18 and 39 to get vaccinated against COVID-19 to reduce the impact of the Delta variant. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Natasha Koifman, the founder of the public relations firm NKPR, poses for a photograph in the backyard of her home in Toronto, on Thursday, August 19, 2021. When Sept. 11 comes, Koifman’s backyard will be awash with chatter and music as up to 100 guests gather for an elegant dinner meant to raise funds for Haitians to access education. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

Return of events pushes hosts to address vaccination, COVID tests and masks

Different events are deciding on different pandemic measures

Natasha Koifman, the founder of the public relations firm NKPR, poses for a photograph in the backyard of her home in Toronto, on Thursday, August 19, 2021. When Sept. 11 comes, Koifman’s backyard will be awash with chatter and music as up to 100 guests gather for an elegant dinner meant to raise funds for Haitians to access education. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin