Calgarians anticipate details on a possible 2026 Winter Games bid

A draft plan is to be presented to city council on Tuesday

Calgarians will get a detailed look at how the city could host the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Games when a draft plan is presented to city council Tuesday.

Capital and operational costs, construction requirements and which sports would be held in which venues are expected to be unveiled by the bid corporation Calgary 2026.

But how much money the federal and provincial governments would contribute to hosting the games won’t be included in the presentation. Those numbers aren’t expected until October.

Councillors had made Sept. 10 both a deadline for information on the benefits, risks, opportunities and costs associated with a bid, and a potential pull-out date should they not like what they see and hear in chambers.

RELATED: Calgary 2026 bid details to be rolled out as city gears up for plebiscite

The deadline to submit 2026 bids to the International Olympic Committee is January. IOC members will vote for the successful host city in September 2019.

The 1988 Winter Olympics were held in Calgary and nearby Canmore, Alta. The venues from those games are the foundation of a potential 2026 bid.

A plebiscite asking Calgarians if they want to host the 2026 Winter Games is scheduled for Nov. 13, although the vote would be cancelled if council pulls the plug on a bid.

An initial estimate of $4.6 billion to host the games, with games revenues covering almost half the cost, was produced by the Calgary Bid Exploration Committee in June 2017.

The IOC has since committed US$925 million, or CDN$1.2 billion, in cash and services to the 2026 host city.

The 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver and Whistler, B.C., cost roughly $7.7 billion.

RELATED: COC session vote approves Calgary as potential host for 2026 Olympics

Corruption scandals and images of derelict facilities from some previous Olympic Games has decreased the desire of the world’s cities to bid for games.

The IOC adopted a series of reforms under the banner of Agenda 2020 to make bidding and hosting less expensive and more sustainable.

The ski jump in Whistler, as well as Edmonton’s sports facilities, have been discussed for possible inclusion in Calgary’s potential bid.

City reports have stated that a games could be a catalyst for the construction of affordable housing in the city.

Other cities mulling a possible 2026 bid include Stockholm, Sweden, Sapporo, Japan, Erzurum, Turkey and a joint Italian bid involving Turin, Milan and Cortina.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Come see Stettler’s Diary of Anne Frank and learn important “lessons from the past”

The Diary of Anne Frank from Feb. 21 to 23 at the Performing Arts Centre

Stettler’s Scotties tournament set a new standard

Chair of curling tournament committee says rural Alberta can host biggest events

Come out to a family-friendly St. Patrick’s Day dance in Botha

Don’t miss the big green bash in Botha Feb. 24

Tickets still available for Stettler County Community Service Awards

42nd annual community service awards at Linda Hall Feb. 21

Alberta to play for gold in wheelchair basketball

Action-packed first week of Canada Winter Games nearly a wrap

Boxers claim two silver medals for Alberta in wild night

Cole Brander of Edmonton fought for the gold medal against Avery Martin-Duval of Quebec

70% of Canadians agree with mandatory vaccines for children: poll

The debate for pro and anti vaccinations has heated up after a measles outbreak in Vancouver

‘A little baloney’ in PM’s claim about solicitor-client privilege on SNC-Lavalin

The Conservatives and NDP want Trudeau to waive that privilege so Wilson-Raybould can offer her side of the story

Proposed edible pot rules are wasteful, would leave products tasteless: critics

When Canada legalized weed last fall, it only allowed fresh or dried bud, oil, plants and seeds

Samsung folding phone is different – but also almost $2,000

But most analysts see a limited market for foldable-screen phones

Alcohol policies fizzle for Canadian governments as harms overflow: reports

About 80 per cent of Canadians drink, and most enjoy a drink or two

Most Read