The tale of tax on everything: MLA Strankman

Alberta’s promise squandered by NDP government

Once upon a time there was a land that had endless potential due to its vast resources that lay at its feet. This enriched province saw varied machinations of managerial ideologies that, in one way or another, came with intended and, yes, unintended consequences, directly related to the people’s actions or lack of actions. This land was so rich and held so much potential, it’ potential was almost mythical in its stature among its neighbors.

After years of cronyism and insider decisions, the people that called this land home decided it was time for a change, however, that change was not what it first appeared to be. Without a word or warning, the agents of change the people empowered, suddenly and without prior notice, levied a tax on everything in the land; for the purposes of this column, we will call it the “a tax on everything.”

This tax had an immediate and profound effect on the very things that generated the wealth in the land that provided the necessities of life for the people. When asked to justify this burden to the good people of the land, it was only met with a contemptuous bout of name-calling and bullying.

The improperly presented intention of this tax was to force the people to cut back on the necessities of life that they rely on to survive. With resulting increases in basic life costs such as heating their homes, feeding their families, and getting to and from work, the people were angry. The peoples’ anger was rooted in the open deception by their government, who for reasons only they understand; they neglected to inform the people that they would be implementing their tax on everything.

As time passed and the peoples’ income was negatively affected, yet another insidious consequence threatened to further harm the people of this land. As time passed and investment dollars dried up in this land of opportunity and wealth, the people were hit with yet another consequence of the tax on everything.

This richly endowed land had resources that people in other lands sought. Now however, the past actions of some of their agents of change had dire negative long-lasting impacts on getting those products to other lands. Between their tax on everything and their past actions protesting the very things that contributed to their own enrichment, the once prosperous land saw its people unemployed at record levels.

The government of this land liked to regale the people with tales of woe when pressed about their fiscal status and the negative effects they have had on the people of their land. The tale they spun was one of fantasy with no acceptance of personal responsibility.

Perhaps if the people in this land’s current government had spent more time moving things forward in the peoples’ best interests rather than protesting and putting a tax on everything, the people of that land would not be facing the current fiscal slide they’re currently on.

Once upon a time there was a land of promise and unlimited potential. I’m confident that the people of that land will be more cautious and they won’t make the same mistake again.

Just Posted

Happy Easter everyone!

Youngsters are excited for the holiday

UCP candidate Nate Horner triumphs in Drumheller-Stettler riding

Horner looking forward to moving ahead with UCP policies in the coming months

Kenney talks pipelines with Trudeau after election win, calls it cordial

Almost a year ago Kenney dismissed Trudeau as a dilettante and a lightweight

Trade show fun!

Annual Stettler Trade Show proves a hit with local residents

Stettler residents cast their votes

Polling station closes at 8 p.m.

‘Open for business:’ Jason Kenney’s UCP wins majority in Alberta election

The UCP was leading or elected in 63 of 87 seats Tuesday night

Kirkland Signature veggie burgers recalled due to possible metal fragments

Recalled products came in 1.7 kg packages with a best before date of Apr. 23, 2019

Parents of 13 who tortured children get life after hearing victims

One of their daughters fled their home and pleaded for help to a 911 operator

Flooding, climate change force Quebecers to rethink relationship with water

Compensation for victims of recurring floods limit to 50% of a home’s value, or a maximum of $100,000

Storms blast South, where tornadoes threaten several states

9.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia at a moderate risk of severe weather

Private cargo ship brings Easter feast to the space station

There are three Americans two Russians and one Canadian living on the space station

Notre Dame rector: “Computer glitch” possible fire culprit

The fire burned through the lattice of oak beams supporting the monument’s vaulted stone ceiling

Undercover cops don’t need warrant to email, text suspected child lurers: court

High court decision came Thursday in the case of Sean Patrick Mills of Newfoundland

VIDEO: Trump tried to seize control of Mueller probe, report says

Special counsel Robert Mueller’s report revealed to a waiting nation Thursday

Most Read