High school grads on path of opportunity

For those young people who graduate from high school, the future might seem unclear.

For those young people who graduate from high school, the future might seem unclear.

Even during times of economic challenges for basic and post-secondary education and the work world, today’s graduates will have plenty of opportunities and options to progress in their lives and careers of choice in the long journey of life.

When young people are in school, they think 12 or 13 years is an eternity.

Actually, this is just a training ground for life as an adult that will take 60 to 70 years.

Although some might know their goals, dreams and aspirations, it does not always happen instantly — or as the old cliché says — overnight.

Knowing that I wanted to be a community newspaper reporter when I graduated in 1980, I actually didn’t start my official career until eight years later after I pursued options in radio and television, before that experience confirmed my strengths and passions in newspaper.

Back in the early 1980s, the recession hit and jobs were hard to get for young people such as myself back then.

And so the launch into my career was delayed a few years.

Since the downturn in the Alberta economy hit last fall, cutbacks and loss of positions have made it tough for today’s youth to get jobs, even summer work.

Unlike the grandparents of today’s graduates and students, when careers were lifelong, today’s graduates will have five or six career or vocation changes.

Don’t give up, keep on persevering.

Every step — forward and backward — is all part of the process to shape our lives.

Remember, each of us in on a lifelong journey of learning and experiences.

Use those resources and tools to help make a difference in your community and global world.

Life is about how each of us influences others around us to make our family, community and the world better for everyone.

Already in small rural communities here in east-central Alberta, graduates and students have ample opportunities to contribute to life around them.

As the William E. Hay graduates were encouraged to do with the theme “Hold on to the Memories,” use all that you have learned and experienced in school to help your life move forward.

Even looking back over many years and decades, local high school graduates have become dignified and valuable citizens in their communities and around the world in variety of vocational and social fields.

This year’s graduates will certainly carry on that tradition.

— Froese’n Time

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