Copenhagen Grifters plan $3,000 con

Would you be upset if you knew your government was about to get duped in a con that would cost your family at least $3,000 a year in new taxes? That is exactly what is happening in Copenhagen right now.

Would you be upset if you knew your government was about to get duped in a con that would cost your family at least $3,000 a year in new taxes? That is exactly what is happening in Copenhagen right now.

The developing world has teamed up with global warming activists in Copenhagen at the world climate conference. Together they are planning the big con. Key to the con is to play on the eco-guilt of the developed world; using it to scam cash from ‘rich countries,’ and transferring it to the developing world; all in the name of ‘ending climate change.’ The Copenhagen grifters are hoping to cash the cheques before the developing world wakes up to the con.

A leaked draft version of the agreement on the table at the Copenhagen climate conference reveals plans for a massive transfer of wealth out of Canada. This transfer will come in the form of new taxes and the establishment of a new world government body for climate change housed in the World Bank.

Lord Christopher Monckton is reported to have obtained a working copy of the draft agreement. He warns that the secretive draft version of the Copenhagen climate change treaty represents a global government power grab on an “unimaginable scale,” and mandates the creation of 700 new bureaucracies as well as a colossal raft of new taxes including two per cent levies on Gross Domestic Product and a two per cent tax on every international financial transaction.

The draft agreement also reportedly contains a provision for a “uniform global levy of $2 dollars per ton of CO2 for all fossil fuel emissions,” as well as an additional tax on every commercial plane journey, except ones that go in or out of poorer countries.

Of course, in addition to these various taxes, the draft agreement, reportedly pushed by President Obama, the UK and Denmark, would require auctioning of allowances to emit carbon dioxide – a cap and tax scheme. Failing to purchase permits would be met with financial penalties or outright prohibitions against such emissions.

The 2 per cent tax on GDP alone would cost Canada some $26 billion. The $2 a tonne tax would add up to $500 million per year. And the tax on international financial transactions would soak untold billions. This total tax grab is at least $26.5 billion, or over $3,000 a year for every Canadian family – not including the tax on financial transactions or plane trips.

This idea would be bad enough even if the cash was meant to stay in Canada. But it is not. The scheme is designed to send this cash to 49 developing nations for them to reduce their CO2 emissions and to create ‘so-called’ green projects. These 49 countries include the likes of Uganda, Burundi and the Sudan.

There is a perception that taxing CO2 will only hurt Canada’s west. However, CO2 emission data from Environment Canada for 2008 reveals that Alberta won’t be alone to feel the pain. While Alberta would bear 42 per cent of this burden, Ontario would have to pay for 26 per cent, due mainly to its substantial reliance on coal for electricity. Moreover, while the energy may be produced in Alberta a large percentage of Alberta’s oil and gas is consume in eastern Canada and many of those taxes will be passed along.

Further, imposing a tax on international financial transactions will place new pressures on Canada’s banks, which, so far, have survived sub-prime mortgage challenges and have weathered the global economic storm.

Canadian families work too hard to see thousands of their tax dollars go from their pocket to some ‘green’ project in Sudan. The Harper government should save Canadians from this international massive tax grab.

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