Alberta Premier Jason Kenney announces $43 million in repairs and improvements to provincial parks at a news conference in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. Kenney says tougher health restrictions likely aimed at Calgary and Edmonton are coming if the current round of rules don’t bend the curve on the COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Todd Korol

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney announces $43 million in repairs and improvements to provincial parks at a news conference in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020. Kenney says tougher health restrictions likely aimed at Calgary and Edmonton are coming if the current round of rules don’t bend the curve on the COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Todd Korol

Top doc says rural COVID-19 rising, but Kenney says cities focus of any new rules

The province reported 1,828 new cases on Friday

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney says tougher health restrictions likely to be aimed at Calgary and Edmonton are coming if current public-health orders don’t bend the curve down on COVID-19.

Kenney, taking questions on a Facebook town-hall meeting, says it makes sense to target the novel coronavirus where it’s having the most impact.

“If you’re in a remote community with a negligible number of COVID cases, where there are no cases in the local hospitals, that is not the issue right now,” Kenney said Thursday night.

“The issue is the hot zones in Calgary and Edmonton — and that’s what we’ll be addressing with increasing focus in the days to come.”

His comments came just hours after Dr. Deena Hinshaw, chief medical health officer, reported a concerning rise in rates in rural areas. She stressed that even one case can move like wildfire and COVID-19 doesn’t respect geographical boundaries.

“COVID-19 is not a Calgary problem or Edmonton problem. This is a provincial problem,” Hinshaw said.

“Our overall active case rates prove that COVID-19 doesn’t care where you live or what your postal code is.”

The province reported 1,828 new cases on Friday. Active cases stood at 18,243. There were 533 people in hospital, 99 of them in intensive care, and a total of 590 Albertans had died.

Alberta Health says more than 15 per cent of active infections are in areas outside the Edmonton and Calgary medical zones. About 30 per cent are outside the four largest cities of Edmonton, Calgary, Red Deer and Lethbridge.

Areas with high active case counts per 100,000 population include Banff, the Municipal District of Acadia and Smoky Lake County.

Kenney has been lauded and criticized for taking a regional, nuanced approach to try to stem the spread of the pandemic while trying to keep open as many businesses and community centres as possible.

It’s not going well.

Alberta has registered well over 1,000 new cases a day for two weeks and, on some days, has had more new cases than larger provinces such as Ontario.

Health officials are reassigning staff, space, and patients to free up more intensive care beds, while dealing with outbreaks at 22 hospitals and health facilities. The government is also exploring bringing in medical field tents from the Red Cross if needed.

Last week, Kenney introduced tighter provincewide health restrictions that included a ban on indoor gatherings.

But there are looser measures for areas with low infection rates. They don’t have to follow a 25 per cent capacity limit in businesses or a maximum of six people — all from the same household — at one table in restaurants. Nor do they have to abide by a one-third capacity rule for worship services.

Most municipalities have made it mandatory to wear masks in indoor public spaces. Kenney has, unlike all other premiers, refused to implement that provincewide. He has said it’s unnecessary in remote areas and some rural folk would refuse to wear masks if it were an order.

Cold Lake, a city of almost 15,000 in the province’s northeast, has twice voted down a mandatory mask bylaw. Mayor Craig Copeland said Friday masks don’t need to be required, because people are following guidelines from Hinshaw.

“Ninety per cent of the people in Cold Lake now are wearing masks,” Copeland said. “Do they really need to be told by a mayor and council to wear a mask?”

Opposition NDP health critic David Shepherd said Kenney’s public-health directives cater to his rural political base and the anti-mask fringe he wants to keep happily ensconced in his United Conservative Party.

“(Kenney) is more interested in protecting his political fortunes with a small minority of folks who are going to resist.”

In Smoky Lake County, northeast of Edmonton, restaurant owner Hong Hu said her Maple Gardens Restaurant is one of the few in the area that is doing takeout only.

“If it gets worse, of course I (will) worry about it,” said Hu, who added she’s more worried about the mounting cases in Alberta than the cases in her region.

She said the county has a mask bylaw and has put notes up at businesses reminding people to wear face coverings and to sanitize regularly.

Back in Cold Lake, resident Cathy Olliffe-Webster, 60, said she is disappointed in the premier and her mayor for not making masks mandatory.

Cold Lake is still holding indoor events such as Christmas craft sales, despite the area’s first COVID-related death this week and active cases rising to more than 70, she said.

“I understand that Alberta’s economy has been hit harder than most, but I’m really sick of people putting money before people’s lives,” Olliffe-Webster said.

She said she was moved by an emotional speech Thursday by Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister, who begged people to follow COVID-19 rules.

“I just wish Jason Kenney was a little like him.”

— With files from Fakiha Baig and Daniela Germano in Edmonton

Dean Bennett, The Canadian Press

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