Thrift volunteers super-frustrated

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  • Jul. 6, 2011 4:00 p.m.

JIM SINCLAIR/Independent editor

The downtown Superfluity Thrift location is an island of affordability for folks who need to save money on some of the necessities of life. Offering that affordability is a group of up to 80 volunteers who work tirelessly to make available a steady supply of clothing, footwear and assorted household goods to those whose budget may allow few other shopping alternatives.

The fact that the sanctuary is being defiled, so to speak, is a source of great irritation to the ladies who run the shop.

Wilma Zurfluh and her co-workers are disappointed by those who see fi t to make off with donations from the in-box in the alley behind the store. They consider it an affront to those who donate, those who prepare and display the goods, and those who depend on the service.

“People rip up the bags and go through the contents,” reported Wilma last Saturday. She said items of clothing had subsequently been seen strewn around town as they were then discarded by the culprit(s).

Another ongoing woe faced by the caring workers is when the drop-off bin itself is used as a garbage dump by an inconsiderate few.

This type of outrage, unfortunately, is nothing new and the Superfluity staff members are aware that the perpetrators are not likely to be deterred by a newspaper article.

What may be accomplished by shedding light on the problem, however, is greater awareness among the public, and even some better observance and reporting of offences to police.

One step the ladies would like to take involves asking the many generous donors to schedule their drop-offs at a time closer to the working hours at the shop.

“We’d like to ask that people bring donations between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.,” said Wilma, indicating the less time the goods sit unattended, the better.

The positive influence the Superfluity Thrift is obvious and, no doubt, appreciated in the community.

Along with the many high value sales made at the outlet, 500 to 600 pounds of items are forwarded weekly to the Diabetes Association by way of the local Wal-Mart, according to Wilma who also declared that $55,000 was injected directly into the community thanks to the Superfluity.

The word superfluity, incidentally, means superabundance.

The local effort has been ongoing since January, 1980.

“We take things people don’t want and sell it at very decent prices to people who don’t have a lot,” informed volunteer Dolores Facas.

As is so often the case, a small number are responsible for some big headaches.

“The majority are very considerate,” Wilma concluded, “bringing in gently-used items.”

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