Sgt. Phil Penny of the Stettler RCMP Detachment. (File Photo)

Think before you take law into your own hands: Stettler RCMP

How would you explain your actions to a judge asks Sgt Penny

With the increase in rural crime people may be tempted to take the law into their own hands but Stettler RCMP Sgt. Phil Penny cautions people to think about what they may do in a situation.

Sgt. Penny spoke to a group of Stettler Rotary members during a luncheon April 9. He said people ask if they are allowed legally to shoot someone who breaks into their home.

“I’m a judge, explain to me why you did what you did. Tell me what the person was doing.

“How people perceive danger is subjective,” added Sgt. Penny. “As a police officer I would perceive things different than you would experience.”

He said there are several factors that need to be considered such as: Are you alone? Are they alone? Is the person bigger than me? Is the person smaller than me? Is there a gender difference? Do they have a firearm? Are they coming towards me? Is it day or night? The most important factor, however, is if you’re able to articulate to a judge why you did what you did.

In addition, Sgt. Penny said if you fire a warning shot you are responsible for what happens with that bullet, where it goes.

To help reduce property theft, Sgt. Penny said people need to take more preventative measures such as taking their keys and locking their vehicles. People need to lock their homes and garages.

“It’s up to the individual,” he said, adding that people in rural communities are used to not locking things up but they need to change their thinking.

“The reason why criminals are coming to rural communities is because they are finding success.”

Sgt. Penny said there’s a reason criminals break into homes in summer villages like Rochon and White Sands.

“Most of the houses are empty all winter long. How many people have any kind of security system is likely next to none.”

Sgt. Penny said break and enters into residences often happen when people are at work and said it doesn’t take long for a criminal to commit a crime.

“You have to take steps to prevent (crime). The positive thing is people are paying attention.”

Just Posted

John Savage pleads guilty to manslaughter

Sentenced to 7 years for Stettler murder

Defending champions Team Scheidegger will fight to keep title

Stettler hosting 2019 Alberta Scotties provincial women’s bonspiel

WATCH: World-renowned illusionist, magician, escapist performs in Stettler

Matt Johnson performs two sold-out shows at Stettler Performing Arts Centre

New market opens in downtown Ponoka

Makkinga Market had a soft opening showcasing many of the different foods in store

UPDATE: B.C. boy, aunt missing for three days

The pair are missing from Kamloops

Liberal bows out of byelection after singling out Jagmeet Singh’s race

Karen Wang says she made comments online that referenced Singh’s cultural background

Kentucky canoe outfit borrows photo of Trudeau family to market business

They are in a red canoe, all clad in life jackets, and Sophie Gregoire Trudeau and Ella-Grace are waving

UPDATED UCP MLA cries foul after brick thrown through office window

UPDATED St. Paul MLA Dave Hanson says ‘Over-the-top NDP rhetoric’ not based in reality

Theresa May wins no-confidence vote after Brexit deal rejection

UK PM can keep her job, after House of Commons voted 325-306

Alberta doctor accused of sexual assault asked to voluntarily give up practice

College says Dr. Barry Wollach should discontinue his practice, given the seriousness of the allegation against him

Red Deerians can weigh in on proposed Bighorn Country investment tonight

Telephone town hall takes place 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Most Read