Snow removal mounting issue for town

Last Tuesday’s town council meeting dealt with — you guessed it — snow removal on Stettler streets.

Last Tuesday’s town council meeting dealt with — you guessed it — snow removal on Stettler streets.

Director of operations Melissa Robbins made a presentation about how the town decides to remove ice and snow from the streets. Council voted to keep the current policy in place, but discussed an aspect of it that has been a recurring problem within the town during a stormy start to this winter.

Specifically, council discussed bylaw XV-1(b) — Snow and Ice Control, which deals with residential snow removal. Under the bylaw, snow from private properties can’t be pushed onto public streets or lanes.

Robbins said the bylaw is being ignored, and as a result, culverts are being covered with ice and snow. That means that in the spring when there’s a lot of water and the town wants to thaw the culverts to prevent flooding, it might not be able to do so because it can’t find the culvert openings, or they’re covered in ice.

“It’s been occurring all over town for years,” Robbins said.

“In the spring, there’s quite a bit of extra work,” said town CAO Rob Stoutenberg. Currently, the bylaw is not enforced, which means that people keep dumping snow.

Council voted to uphold the bylaw, but didn’t make any amendments to it.

Council discussed the benefits of educating the public on the proper snow policies, rather than punishing them.

“I would strongly encourage the educational aspect as much as possible,” said Mayor Dick Richards.

“We’re confident that they’ll come around and this won’t be a problem anymore,” Robbins said.

Coun. Al Campbell was more in favour of action.

“I think we’ve had enough education,” Campbell said.

The recommendation brought forward by Robbins was to use mailouts and advertisements to make Stettler residents aware of the bylaw and the consequences of covering the culverts.

 

Just Posted

Puff, puff, pass: Cannabis is officially legal across Canada

Alberta readies itself for cannabis sales with 17 stores (for now) and a new provincial website

Wm. E. Hay hands out awards

High School students honoured

Clearview Public Schools requesting modular classrooms for Gus Wetter School

School’s capacity decreased to 305 students from 358

VIDEO: First legal cannabis purchases as midnight strikes in eastern Canada

Newfoundland and Labrador was the first province to kick off the sale of cannabis, just after midnight local time

After 50 years, ‘Sesame Street’ Big Bird puppeteer retiring

The puppeteer who has played Big Bird on “Sesame Street” is retiring after nearly 50 years on the show.

Britain, EU decide to take some time in getting Brexit right

Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said “we need much time, much more time and we continue to work in the next weeks.”

Parole denied for convicted killer-rapist Paul Bernardo after 25 years in prison

Paul Bernardo plead for release on Wednesday by arguing he has done what he could to improve himself during his 25 years in prison.

B.C. Lions look to cement CFL playoff spot with victory over Eskimos

B.C. can cement a post-season berth in the wild West Division on Friday night with a home win over the Edmonton Eskimos

Canada ban on asbestos takes effect but mining residues are exempt

Environment Minister Catherine McKenna plans to announce the new regulations implementing the ban on Thursday in Ottawa

Harry and Meghan bring rain to drought-stricken Outback town

Prince Harry and his wife Meghan are on day two of their 16-day tour of Australia and the South Pacific.

Demand for legalized cannabis in early hours draws lineups, heavy web traffic

Government-run and privately operated sales portals went live at 12:01 a.m. local time across Canada, eliciting a wave of demand.

Most Read