This white GMC pick-up truck was caught on surveillance cameras at Dymy Oil Field Services in Stettler

This white GMC pick-up truck was caught on surveillance cameras at Dymy Oil Field Services in Stettler

Police asking for help in preventing thefts

Another week, another report of multiple thefts – and police are asking residents to take steps to help them cut down on crimes.

Another week, another report of multiple thefts – and police are asking residents to take steps to help them cut down on the number of opportunities for ambitious thieves.

On Friday, Sept. 11, police responded to a call about an abandoned vehicle on Highway 56. There, they found the vehicle, stopped, in the southbound lane, its hazard lights flashing.

Upon arriving, police noted the vehicle, a white 2003 Ford Superduty F350 had been stolen. Through investigation, it was discovered that it was taken earlier in the evening from Aspen Ford.

Stettler RCMP commander, Cpl. Cameron Russell, said it was “quite courteous” of the thieves to leave the hazard lights on, which undoubtedly prevented a collision with the vehicle.

The same night, another truck, same model, was also stolen from Aspen Ford. Police believe the same thieves returned to the dealership and took another truck.

This truck was involved in numerous incidents all over central Alberta. Afthe chase for public safety.

The drivers of the truck later did a gas-n-dash in both Three Hills and Lacombe, and then the suspects tried to steal another truck in Ponoka.

In Ponoka, the owner of the truck “foiled” the attempt, Russell said, and the thieves fled in the stolen truck.

“There’s a definite increase in property crime,” Russell said. Local RCMP haveer noticing suspicious behaviour, Innisfail RCMP tried to pull the truck over and pursued for a short time, before breaking off t increased patrols in areas that seem to be frequently targeted, but are hoping residents will remain alert and contact the detachment if they seen unusual or suspicious behaviour.

Russell said owners of vehicles need to lock their doors, even on rural properties, and not leave their keys in the ignition. It’s important that vehicles have items that could tempt thieves removed and placed inside or out of sight as well.

Also on Friday, but in an unrelated incident, unknown person or persons broke in to Dymy Oil Field Services and stole a 2003 flat-deck trailer. Surveillance footage from the incident has revealed a distinctive white GMC truck towing the trailer away. The break-in happened at 8:30 p.m.

Anyone with information about these or any other crimes are asked to phone Stettler RCMP at 403-742-3382, or anonymously contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

Long-gun registry demise inconvenient: RCMPWith several guns stolen in the past few weeks, RCMP have found themselves longing for access to the long-gun registry, which was dismantled after being killed by the current government.

“A lot of people don’t keep a record of their serial numbers,” Russell explained. “When we recover these weapons, we have no way of knowing who they belong to and where they were stolen from.”

Before the registry was dismantled, police would be able to reunite owners of stolen weapons with their owners. Now, it all depends on the owners having records proving the weapons are, in fact, theirs. It also relies on the owners contacting police and providing the information, as without that, there’s no way for police to find the owners.

It’s not just weapons people should be keeping serial numbers on, but all property. Whether its electronics, vehicles, weapons or jewellery, identifying serial numbers should be kept so if there is a robbery, it can be reported to police.

Without these numbers, there’s no way to decisively say that stolen property belongs to one individual, Russell said.

“If it doesn’t have a serial number, add something to it,” he said, suggesting writing initials, a licence number, etc. on the item, so in case of theft it can be identified.