Pictured here is the local Stettler history book committee. Back from left are Laurie Tait, Nancy Land, Joan Heuer, Donna Chapman, Jack Schulze and Ross Martin. Front from left are Anita Mappin, Joy Wood, Tammy Menard, Stan Eichhorn and Verna Rock. photo submitted

Pictured here is the local Stettler history book committee. Back from left are Laurie Tait, Nancy Land, Joan Heuer, Donna Chapman, Jack Schulze and Ross Martin. Front from left are Anita Mappin, Joy Wood, Tammy Menard, Stan Eichhorn and Verna Rock. photo submitted

Organizers behind the Stettler history book project seeking more input

Committee members hope to have material gathered by the end of January

Organizers behind a Stettler history book continue to put out the call for the community’s input, and they are hoping to have all the material in and digitized by the end of January.

“There are a few things that we would like to emphasize,” said committee member Stan Eichhorn during a recent chat at the P&H Elevator.

“One of the things that we are looking for right now are donations to help us with the continuing costs – the preparation of the book. So all donations are gratefully accepted.”

Donations can be mailed to P.O. Box 1437, Stettler. The postal code is T0C 2L0.

“One of the things that we have to do when we go to publishing the book, is that we have to put up 50 per cent of the cost,” he explained. “That’s one of the things that we are going to have to face – not for a while, but down the road for sure.

“Something else that we really need now is more volunteer help,” he added. “We need volunteers to research information on some of the files that we have started and that we would like to develop further,” he explained.

Areas for more research run the gamut from past and present local businesses, medical and postal staff, and school principals to a range of community clubs such as the Kinsmen and the Lions.

“We have very little information on most of them,” he explained. “And they are certainly an integral part of our history,” he said, adding that 4-H clubs are another initiative they don’t have a lot on, and young people’s clubs in general.

“So we do need those volunteers who will take on those projects – big or small – and find out what’ s needed to basically complete the story,” he said.

“We’d also like a few pages on Christmases in Stettler,” he said. “So those are a couple of the main things we need – volunteers and donations. We’d also like to reiterate that people don’t have to have lived here for a certain number of years to take part (in the book).”

Even those who have called Stettler home for a relatively short period of time most certainly have a story or two to contribute, he said. “Those will help to tell the story of the town, too.”

Meanwhile, there have been a steady stream of submissions, said Eichhorn.

“We’ve been getting a fair bit of stuff lately – we will be pushing 600 files before too long.”

He also pointed out that the project is very short on photos.

“We really need pictures, and they can be in colour as we are doing the book in colour,” he explained.

Photos don’t even necessarily have to be attached to a particular story, as long as they have names and some details included with each submission.

According to the commitee’s web site, “Stettler is one of the few towns in the area that does not have a book dedicated to the history of the community. Botha, Big Valley, Red Willow all have their own books, as well as Bashaw, which is discussing another one in the near future.

“Without these books, it is very easy for the colorful stories of our communities to vanish as the people who lived them slowly start to leave us. It is important to remember the history of our community, and to have a physical record of the many wonderful people who not only built our town, but continue to make it a great place to live.”

In the meantime, committee members also wish to emphasize that they are available to help craft stories for the project as well.

To that end, there is a a spacious and bright basement room adjacent to the P&H Elevator where folks can come and do research and work on their stories.

“We are usually here on Saturdays, and other days by appointment if necessary,” said Eichhorn.

For more information about the book project, you can email Joy Wood at joywood@telus.net, Verna Rock at vj.rock@telus.net or Stan Eichhorn at stan.eichhorn@gmail.com. You can also call 403-742-2249.

As to the overall purpose of the book, it’s important for future generations to have a record of their community’s history, said committee member Joy Wood. “It’s our history – it’s family and it’s about community,” she said, adding that it’s also critical that the local history is recorded and the sooner, the better. “Pretty soon, there isn’t going to be anyone to ask,” she pointed out.

Verna Rock, a committee member as well, agreed.

She also urged local citizens to contribute, with a reminder that they don’t want to be disappointed when the finished product is out there and their particular family isn’t represented.

“I’ve said to people, I think that it’s also a tribute to your parents and to your grandparents – whoever also established and/or lived here and helped to build this community to what it is,” explained Eichhorn.

“We want to try and give future generations more of an appreciation as to what went into this community, and why it’s a good community.”

Again, for more about the project, call 403-742-2249 or email stettlerhistorybook@gmail.com, vj.rock@telus.net or stan.eichhorn@gmail.com.

Find them on Facebook at ‘Stettler History Book’.

Again, submissions can also be mailed to P.O. Box 1437, Stettler. The postal code is T0C 2L0.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A scene from last year’s Light the Night fundraising event at the Stettler Town and Country Museum. This year’s rendition is on a drive-through basis only, but it still promises to be a not-to-be-missed seasonal event.
Independent file photo
Stettler Town and Country Museum hosts ‘Light the Night’

This year’s rendition is drive-through only, but will still prove to be a dazzling display

“I urge Albertans to exercise patience and kindness in the days ahead," Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, said Friday. (Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
New record: Red Deer at 236 active COVID cases

Province provides daily update

Janelle Robinson owns and operates Spirit’s Respite Ranch near Stettler. The Ranch, just north of Stettler, is an animal therapy ranch that helps those with special needs and conditions ranging from PTSD to anxiety. Mark Weber/Stettler Independent
Spirit’s Respite Ranch near Stettler provides support through animal interaction

‘I also come from a family of doers - if something that is needed isn’t there, you just figure it out’

A long-time Castor Resident is on the move. Luella Kowalsky, who has lived in the Town of Castor since 1977, is moving to an assisted living facility in Innisfail to be closer to family. Kevin J. Sabo photo
Long-time Castory resident Luella Kowalsky is leaving the community

Kowalsky will be closer to two of her kids, who live in the Sundre area

birds
It’s almost time for the 121st Audubon Christmas Bird Count!

This year’s counts will take place between Monday, Dec. 14th through Tuesday, Jan. 5th, 2021

Idyllic winter scenes are part of the atmosphere of the holiday season, and are depicted in many seasonal movies. How much do you know about holiday movies? Put your knowledge to the test. (Pixabay.com)
QUIZ: Test your knowledge of holiday movies and television specials

The festive season is a time for relaxing and enjoying some seasonal favourites

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland listens to a question from a reporter on the phone during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Spending too little worse than spending too much, Freeland says as Canada’s deficit tops $381B

‘The risk of providing too little support now outweighs that of providing too much’

Wetaskiwin Composite High School. Shaela Dansereau/ Pipestone Flyer.
Wetaskiwin Regional Public Schools prepare for transition back to online learning

Grades 7-12 will are mandated to transfer to online learning starting Nov. 30, 2020.

Lawyer Devon Page, Ecojustice Canada’s executive director, pauses during a news conference in Vancouver on Wed., Sept. 26, 2012. The environmental law group has lost its bid to pause Alberta’s inquiry into where critics of its oil and gas industry get their funding. Ecojustice sought an injunction this summer to suspend the inquiry, headed by forensic accountant Steve Allan, until there is a decision on whether it’s legal. nbsp;THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Judge tosses application to pause Alberta inquiry into funding of oil and gas foes

Ecojustice sought an injunction in the summer to suspend the inquiry

Janelle Robinson owns and operates Spirit’s Respite Ranch near Stettler. The Ranch, just north of Stettler, is an animal therapy ranch that helps those with special needs and conditions ranging from PTSD to anxiety. Mark Weber/Stettler Independent
Spirit’s Respite Ranch near Stettler provides support through animal interaction

‘I also come from a family of doers - if something that is needed isn’t there, you just figure it out’

A pedestrian makes their way through the snow in downtown Ottawa on Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Wild winter, drastic swings in store for Canada this year: Weather Network

In British Columbia and the Prairies, forecasters are calling for above-average snowfall levels

NDP Leader John Horgan, left, speaks as local candidate Ravi Kahlon listens during a campaign stop at Kahlon’s home in North Delta, B.C., on April 18, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
A B.C. Ambulance Service paramedic wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 moves a stretcher outside an ambulance at Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Top doctor urges Canadians to limit gatherings as ‘deeply concerning’ outbreaks continue

Canada’s active cases currently stand at 63,835, compared to 53,907 a week prior

A Canadian Pacific freight train travels around Morant’s Curve near Lake Louise, Alta., on Monday, Dec. 1, 2014. A study looking at 646 wildlife deaths along the railway tracks in Banff and Yoho national parks in Alberta and British Columbia has found that train speed is one of the biggest factors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Study finds train speed a top factor in wildlife deaths in Banff, Yoho national parks

Research concludes effective mitigation could address train speed and ability of wildlife to see trains

Most Read