Never too late for 10-year farm plan

Winter webinar series great way to learn new farm strategies at home

Submitted by Alberta Agriculture

No matter what age, it’s never too early or late to put together a ten-year plan for your farm.

“Farmers are always busy with their daily and seasonal tasks,” says Rick Dehod, farm financial specialist, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. “When asked what their plan is for the next 10 years, they often say they haven’t had a chance to work on it yet. Whether the next generation is ready to take over, or you are in the prime of your farming career, you need to ask yourself what the farm business will look like 10 years from now.”

In 2016, a new module was added to the Census of Agriculture regarding written succession plans. The results indicated that only 8.4 per cent of all operations have a written succession plan.

Of those farm businesses that were family corporations and non-family corporations, 16.3 per cent had a succession plan. A succession plan is a written plan made by the main farm operators to transfer ownership, labour and control of the operation to another person.

“If you are 55 now, your life expectancy is possibly another 25 years. How long will you farm? How long will you physically and mentally be able to? If your desire is for the farm to continue, who is the successor, are you grooming them to be the next farm manager, and have you asked them if they want to? Is there a plan? Is so, is it written and who knows about it?”

If there is no successor, then what is the estate plan, asks Dehod. “Filing your income tax on a cash basis allows for the deferral of tax through the use of various strategies. But when you exit the business, this tax becomes due and payable, and the biggest beneficiary of your estate could be the Canada Revenue Agency. Do you want that? If you are in this category, maybe it’s a good time to develop an exit strategy that will minimize the tax you will pay as you wind down your farm business and you transfer assets into your estate. Is it time to talk to your accountant about this?”

If you have a successor, then what is the shared vision for the farm or ranch? “The vision is the shared image of the family’s definition of success and what the family wants the business and legacy to be. Having a clear vision allows the family to set goals and address the dreams of the family. This is critical to the success of the family, the individuals and to the farm business.”

Dehod says this discussion should start with a family meeting and asking some simple yet complex questions:

What do we desire for our family, the founders, the successors, and those non-farm members?

What will our family story and legacy be?

What do we want for the next generation and possibly into the next?

How will our family values influence our vision and where we want to go?

What will we do and not do?

How will the farm business be part of our family vision?

Who is leading the farm business now and into the future, and how are they leading?

“Although the answers to these questions may not be clear cut, they can provide a good base for discussion and the start of a plan. These answers will also create an awareness for that 10-year plan and a go-forward framework on how the business will evolve. They will also provide clarity to all involved including those who no longer live on the farm.”

Winter webinar series

During the winter season, the Ag Info Centre will be hosting a series of webinars showcasing the services and knowledge base of both their specialists and key department resources, while covering topics that are beneficial to the province’s agriculture industry.

The next webinar in the series is on the basics of bin management and takes place at 10 a.m. on November 22, 2017.

“With harvest recently completed and the grain ‘in the bin’ it’s important to maintain the quality of the stored grain,” says Mark Cutts, crop specialist, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. “Decreases in grain quality while in the bin can have a significant economic impact.”

In this webinar, Joy Agnew from the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute (PAMI) will discuss various aspects of managing grain in the bin including natural air drying, aeration, use of supplemental heat and grain monitoring technology.

To register for the webinar, go to https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8415407298396408066.

Just Posted

Lacombe’s Morrison House Cafe to close Aug. 30

Morrison House recently celebrated 100 years in Lacombe

Five km run and walk raises funds for Stettler Hospice Society

Stettler District Ambulance Association encourages community to be active

Ol’ MacDonald’s Resort has a packed line-up of musical performances

Weekend country music festival set for Sept. 6th-8th

Alberta RCMP warns property owners of paving contractor scams

Travelling companies offer paving or roof sealing services typically to seniors in rural communities

Trudeau vows to stand firm against ‘increasingly assertive’ China

China has accused Canada of meddling in its affairs

Red Deer Rebels Training Camp begins Aug. 24

Rebels home opener will be on Sept. 21 against the Edmonton Oil Kings

Search continues for possible drowning on Sylvan Lake

Sylvan Lake RCMP and Fire Department continue their search for 20-something adult male

New study suggests autism overdiagnosed: Canadian expert

Laurent Mottron: ‘Autistic people we test now are less and less different than typical people’

Huawei executive’s defence team alleges Canadians were ‘agents’ of the FBI

eng’s arrest at Vancouver’s airport has sparked a diplomatic crisis between Canada and China

Trans Mountain gives contractors 30 days to get workers, supplies ready for pipeline

Crown corporation believes the expansion project could be in service by mid-2022

On vaccines, abortion, Goop, doctor Jen Gunter says: ‘I have a duty to speak up’

She speaks out on menstruation, the wellness industry and vaccines

RCMP and fire departments respond to possible drowning on Sylvan Lake

RCMP say they are actively searching for a man in his 20s with boats on the lake

Most Read