Updated: Man accused of killing Red Deer doctor makes bizarre court appearance

Updated: Man accused of killing Red Deer doctor makes bizarre court appearance

Deng Mabiour repeatedly asks judge why no one is asking him why he killed his family doctor

In a bizarre court appearance, a man accused of killing a Red Deer physician repeatedly asked a judge why no one was asking why he killed his family doctor.

Deng Mabiour, 54, of Red Deer, appeared in Red Deer provincial court on Wednesday morning through a closed-circuit video link with the Red Deer Remand Centre.

Mabiour appeared in blue prison coveralls with his hands handcuffed in front of him and appeared agitated from the start. For much of his appearance, he huddled in a corner of the remand centre video room after complaining about a sore knee.

He complained that nobody had asked him why he killed Dr. Walter Reynolds, 45, who was attacked in his north Red Deer walk-in clinic on the morning of Aug. 10.

“I have a reason I killed my family doctor,” said Mabiour.

The judge told him this was not the time for his explanations and asked whether he had a lawyer.

“Nobody should be speaking on my behalf,” said Mabiour. “At least I should have been given a chance to talk about why I killed my family doctor.”

Mabiour suggested people weren’t listening to him and “that’s why I took the law into my own hands.”

The judge pressed Mabiour whether he wanted to speak to duty counsel about his charges.

Mabiour rambled on about “corruption,” and again inquired why no one asked him the reasons behind the killing.

Mabiour is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Reynolds, who was mortally wounded in the Village Mall Walk-In Clinic around 11 a.m. The father of two died later in hospital.

The accused is also charged with assaulting a police officer who responded to the 911 call, and assaulting with a machete, another doctor at the clinic.

Duty counsel Mark Daoust told the judge that Mabiour had applied for a lawyer through legal aid, but later cancelled his application.

Judge Bert Skinner encouraged Mabiour to get a lawyer.

“I can represent myself,” he replied. “I don’t want to have a lawyer, please. I want to be given a chance to talk about why I killed my family doctor — period.”

Skinner, who was trying his best to be patient with Mabiour, reminded him that this was not the time.

“I’m not interested in the reasons for why you did what you did. That has to go to another court for that reason.”

Mabiour, who is originally from South Sudan, remained obstinate.

“I don’t know how you carry out justice here in Canada. Canada lawyer is not good for me.”

Mabiour then began rambling again about wanting to explain his side of things.

“It’s very, very long story. I did not kill him for a crime or for no reason.

“I killed my doctor for a good reason.”

Skinner again told him to get a lawyer.

“Right now, I can’t hear a plea or the facts. Do you understand that?”

Finally giving up, Skinner asked defence counsel to speak to Mabiour privately to determine if he understood the charges.

About 40 minutes later, Mabiour reappeared on camera, but not before a sheriff told him he must stand.

“You need to stand up. The judge needs to see you,” she ordered Mabiour, who had taken his place on the floor again.

“It’s OK,” said the judge, carrying on with Mabiour remaining seated.

The duty counsel told Skinner he got no response from Mabiour when asked if he understood the charges and his right to elect how he wanted to be tried in Court of Queen’s Bench. He can request a jury trial or judge alone.

Skinner said he was not convinced that Mabiour understood the charges and the court proceedings he was facing. He ordered that he be assessed to determine if he is fit to stand trial.

Mabour returns to court on Sept. 14.

The judge explained the Criminal Code only allows him to send Mabiour to hospital for the assessment for five days. However, a psychiatrist can ask for an extension if more time is needed.

At his last court appearance a month ago, Mabiour acted just as agitated. That time, he said he was sick and did not remember the attack.



pcowley@reddeeradvocate.com

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