The staff at Busted Ladies Lingerie help you find the right fit, with maternity bras up to an O cup. Left to right: Loanna Gulka, Sherry Gummow and Trish Friis. Missing from photo: Eve Kupers, Marijke Kager and Lynette Fiveland.

The staff at Busted Ladies Lingerie help you find the right fit, with maternity bras up to an O cup. Left to right: Loanna Gulka, Sherry Gummow and Trish Friis. Missing from photo: Eve Kupers, Marijke Kager and Lynette Fiveland.

Moms deserve SUPPORT too!

If your favourite maternity store has closed, it’s time to try this Ponoka shop

Sherry Gummow’s children are now in their 30s and 40s, but she still has vivid memories of the days surrounding each childbirth.

“I can tell you what I was doing the day before my daughter was born. I don’t think it’s something we forget. I think the memory of the pain fades, but we always remember those things,” she says.

The three other moms who work alongside Gummow in her Ponoka lingerie shop agree — pregnancy and nursing was a special time they’ll never forget, and they also agree that finding a proper-fitting nursing bra was a struggle. At Busted Ladies Lingerie staff always work to support women — physically and emotionally — and it’s no different when it comes to maternity and nursing bras.

“Sometimes the hormonal changes during pregnancy can cause women to feel worse about themselves. We’re always about helping women feel good,” Gummow says.

Staff find the best fit possible, and take care to find a bra that works with your body. If your favourite maternity store has closed, try Busted Ladies for a wide selection.

“We carry up to a KK/O in maternity and will do our best to work with you no matter your budget,” Gummow says. “Since our bodies change a lot from conception to birth, and women need bras both before and after delivery, we might even browse the sale rack — instead of jumping straight to a maternity bra. We also have the option of a conversion kit, allowing you to turn your favourite bra into a nursing bra, with a little help from a seamstress.”

No matter what you need, the staff at Busted Ladies Lingerie are eager to help.

“There’s no rhyme or reason to how a pregnant body changes! You can have six kids, and your body will change differently every time,” Gummow says.

3 benefits to a good maternity bra

  • Adjustable cups: Gummow says you can expect to move up at least two cup sizes during your pregnancy, so Busted Ladies offers a nursing bra with adjustable cups that go up to a size N or O. “Our breasts change throughout the nine months, as well as between nursings, so adjustable cups are very popular.” When your baby goes through a growth spurt around three months, expect your breasts to grow as well.
  • Adjustable waist band: Most bras have three or four sets of clasps on the waistband to adjust fit; nursing bras at Busted Ladies mostly have six sets. As your body changes, adjust your bra to stay comfortable.
  • Fashion and function: “Maternity bras used to be very utilitarian, but there are lots of great options now if you’re looking for a fashionable confidence boost,” Gummow says. Busted Ladies carries wire and wire-free bras, so you can choose when you want to prioritize comfort and when you want to give shape to your silhouette.

For choice in styles, a great fit and hometown service, visit Busted Ladies Lingerie in Ponoka at 5024 51st Ave. ‘It’s worth the drive!’

Fashion and Stylewomen entrepreneurs

 

Sherry Gummow, owner of Busted Ladies Lingerie, shows off some of the store’s nursing and maternity bras.

Sherry Gummow, owner of Busted Ladies Lingerie, shows off some of the store’s nursing and maternity bras.

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