Stettler’s fifth graders score big in science fair

Stettler Elementary School fifth graders achieved spectacular results at the Central Alberta Regional Science Fair

Authors of successful results at the Central Alberta Regional Science Fair: Back row (l to r): Cassidy UnKauf

Authors of successful results at the Central Alberta Regional Science Fair: Back row (l to r): Cassidy UnKauf

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Stettler Elementary School fifth graders achieved spectacular results at the Central Alberta Regional Science Fair (CARSF) on Friday and Saturday, April 11 and 12, at the Bower Place Mall in Red Deer. They won a gold medal, two silver medals, four bronze medals, and certificates, as well as other prizes.

The students competed in the grade 5/6 category, and had seven of the top 12 projects.

“We are proud of our students’ excellent results. They were competing against a total of 26 projects that were the best from across central Alberta,” said grade 5 science teacher, Rob Howell. “Our students successfully competed against many students a grade ahead of them. Their adherence to the scientific method, and their effective use of technology allowed them to compete at such a high level.”

Howell was speaking on behalf of fellow Grade 5 science teachers Carmen Fox, Bonnie Lynn, and Stefan Olafson.

Faith Shuckburgh won a gold medal, a certificate, and an award from the Red Deer River Naturalists for her project on “Five seconds to a stomach ache.” She grew bacterial cultures from food that had fallen on the floor.

Hailie Ripley and Jenna Vowles won silver medals, certificates, and $50.00 each from the Association of Professional Engineers, Geologists, and Geophysicists of Alberta (APEGGA) for their project on “Brawny Bridges.

Rylee Frank and Katie Satre won silver medals and certificates for their project on “Cool mint.”

Winning bronze medals and certificates were Jaden Norman and Chloe Strohschein for their project on “Water effects”; Elisa Collard and Emma Werbowesky for “Who wants popcorn?”; Nicholas Deaver for “Sports drinks: Are they worth it?”; and Cassidy UnKauf and Hanna Moon for “Stormy tsunamis.”

Kyla Johnston and Carly Jones won an award from the Red Deer River Naturalists for their project on “Melting ice.”

“Students integrated knowledge from all core subjects to create their project. They then had to analyze what the information and data they collected meant to reach conclusions that had practical applications to society,” Howell said.

“We were pleased as staff to see the passion our students showed in completing their projects. The skills they have learned will serve them well as they progress through life.”