Students in Clearview school division, including this group from Erskine, celebrate Orange Shirt day. For more photos go to www.stettlerindependent.com. (Contributed photo)

Clearview students participate in Orange Shirt Day

Shows respect and reconciliation for Aboriginals impacted by residential schools

Orange Shirt Day is an opportunity for teachers, students, parents, and other community members to wear an orange shirt and open up a discussion on all aspects of residential schools. It is an opportunity to grow our understanding, and to show our support towards reconciliation.

On Sept. 28 Clearview school staff, students and central office staff wore orange shirts to show respect and reconciliation for those Aboriginals impacted by residential schools.

Clearview Public Schools has made honouring Aboriginal students and culture part of their strategic priorities. All students in our communities belong and need to feel safe in Clearview Public Schools.

“Clearview Public Schools’ staff, students, and central services are wearing orange T-shirts today to recognize the history of the Canadian Residential Schools System and the impact of the past government policy on Aboriginals,” said Director of Inclusive Learning Grant Gosse. “Clearview has over 160 students self-identified as Aboriginal, and we continue to help and support the success of our students.”

Five years ago, Williams Lake, B. C. hosted a memorial event for the St. Joseph Mission (SJM) School. Former students were given a chance to share their memories from their time with one student, Phyllis, telling the story of having her brand new orange shirt taken away on her first day of residential school. The poignancy of her tale has inspired schools in B. C., and across Canada, to put on orange shirts of their own to celebrate reconciliation in their own communities.

– Contributed

 

Some of the Clearview central office staff. (Contributed photo)

Clearview Family School Liaison. (Contributed photo) Clearview Family School Liaison. (Contributed photo)

Stettler’s Wm. E. Hay. (Contributed photo)

Stettler Elementary School students. (Contributed photo)

Brownfileld. (Contributed photo)

Byemoor students. (Contributed photo)

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