Chapman left his mark in service

The Stettler community hall was packed Jan. 5, 2013, as mourners paid their final respects to Jack Chapman, a man whom some people

The Canadian flag outside the Royal Canadian Legion in Stettler was lowered last January in memory of Jack Chapman

The Stettler community hall was packed Jan. 5, 2013, as mourners paid their final respects to Jack Chapman, a man whom some people described as “larger than life.”

An estimated 700 people attended the funeral of the revered Second World War veteran.

Chapman died on his farm on New Year’s Day. He was 92.

Chapman was a lifelong resident of the Stettler area, except for his wartime years. He and wife Madeleine farmed southeast of Stettler.

“He was courageous, had strong convictions and was not known to hold back,” longtime friend Lorne Thurston said of Chapman. “He was a loyal friend.”

Chapman was a prisoner of war in the Dieppe Raid at France in August 1942. He not only survived that three-year ordeal, but his comrades also credited him with saving their lives through his “bravery, resourcefulness and charm.”

At the funeral service, Thurston and his wife, Kathy, were among those who paid tribute to Chapman.

Thurston spent more than 37 years with Chapman in Stettler’s Branch No. 59 of the Royal Canadian Legion.

He said his proudest moment was to walk with “a true hero — Jack Chapman.”

For many Stettler-area residents, Chapman and the Legion seemed synonymous. The highly visible war hero rarely missed a Legion function since returning home from the war when it ended in 1945.

Not only was he involved in the local branch, but he was active nationally and travelled abroad.

“He had a strong, positive influence on Veteran Affairs,” Thurston said.

Chapman was a perennial favourite speaker at Remembrance Day services and to students of all ages. He was active in the poppy campaign.

He was described as being a storyteller — of real-life stories — and often shared his wartime experiences.

Chapman delighted in giving young students a Canadian flag on Canada Day.

Thurston said Chapman believed in helping his community and was a volunteer with rodeos, sports, the agricultural society and as a longtime parade marshal.

Thurston summed up Chapman’s strong-willed character as “a fighter,” saying he survived the war, the loss of a child and many illnesses.

One of the mourners at the funeral said Chapman was a Stettler standout.

“If we ever had a local hero, it was Jack,” she said. “It really was.”

Ken Cherewko, past-president of the Stettler branch of the Legion, recalled Chapman’s influence on the branch.

“He had the answers,” said Cherewko, who added Chapman was always available for advice and was willing to share his opinion.

Cherewko said Chapman held every position in the local Legion and was the first vice-president in the national organization. “He kept Stettler updated.”

Cherewko said Chapman hadn’t been active in the regular day-to-day operations of the Stettler Legion in recent years.

“He left that to us younger ones. (But) he still took part in major functions, like Decoration Day at Gadsby.

“We are all going to miss him.”

One of Chapman’s neighbours, Ron Scheerschmidt, said Chapman died doing what he enjoyed — feeding his cattle.

“I’ve known Jack all my life and he definitely didn’t want to waste away in a nursing home — he went the way he wanted.”

Scheerschmidt remembered Chapman as being an early riser.

“He was always up way before the birds,” said Scheerschmidt, who also recalled Chapman’s determination. “He wouldn’t let go until it was accomplished.”

Among those many accomplishments were the addition of public washrooms in Stettler and renaming 50 Avenue to Veterans’ Way, Scheerschmidt said.

“He was a character of his own. He was a good neighbour.”

— Stettler Independent


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