Traditional horse-wagon rides were part of the fun Saturday as Alix hosted Come Walk Among Us historial tours throughout the community. The hotel provided a fitting backdrop.

Traditional horse-wagon rides were part of the fun Saturday as Alix hosted Come Walk Among Us historial tours throughout the community. The hotel provided a fitting backdrop.

Alix throws history party

Alix was in the historical spotlight to promote its rich history as the community welcomed residents and visitors to Come Walk Among Us

Alix was in the historical spotlight to promote its rich history as the community welcomed residents and visitors to Come Walk Among Us last Saturday.

“What a wonderful day and experience to learn local history, one man told me, “said Donna Peterson, president of Alix Wagon Wheel Museum, which co-hosted the event in partnership with Boomtown Trail tourism association.

“We had lots of comments and emails from people who said they had a wonderful time.

“It was a great opportunity to showcase our history.”

With the success of the event, organizers intend to plan for next year and likely combine it with another annual community event, she said.

Old-fashioned churning butter and ice cream making at the museum were big hits for the younger generation.

“Kids loved to help turn the crank on the old churn,” Peterson said.

Walking tours with characters of the past, home-made pies, arts and music, a polo game, Metis culture, horse-drawn wagon rides and a few vehicles in a show-and- shine highlighted the day.

History came to life through the eyes of Irene Parlby of the Famous Five as local MLA for Lacombe riding from 1921 to 1935 and first women in Alberta cabinet and among the founders of the first women’s local of the United Farmers of Alberta.

“It’s good to have the Metis presence,” said Marlene Lanz, regional president of the Metis Nation of Alberta.

“Metis has a long history history that dates back to the mid-1880s at Tail Creek, Boss Hill and Big Valley.”

“We got a lot of people interested in our history.”

Started in Bashaw last year, Boomtown Trail has a passion to continue the historical journey in central Alberta.

“We want every town to do this event annually and organize it on their own,” said Ken Duncan, the executive-director.

“These types of events help bring the community together, and to share memories. This is about building community.”