Opinion Column by MP Kevin Sorenson. FILE PHOTO

Trudeau’s secret payout and apology to Khadr is wrong

Many consider Trudeau’s choice an act of disrespect to the men and women in Canada’s military.

Everywhere that I go in Battle River-Crowfoot, constituents are making sure that as their Member of Parliament, I know their opinion that Prime Minister Trudeau’s secret payment and apology to convicted terrorist Omar Khadr is wrong. Our democracy and freedom of speech is a main part of what terrorists in many places around the world abhor about our western values. I thank everyone who has contacted me to express their view, as always.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government has paid millions of taxpayer dollars in compensation to Omar Khadr. The Liberal government refuses to tell Canadians just how much of our money has been given to Omar Khadr.

Conservatives believe that it is one thing to acknowledge alleged mistreatments by other countries, but it is another to secretly award a convicted terrorist that murdered an allied soldier. This was Justin Trudeau’s choice and he is responsible for the decision. The Supreme Court of Canada did not instruct the Prime Minister of Canada to give one cent to Omar Khadr. Repatriation was the proper remedy to the Supreme Court’s 2010 ruling on the violation of Khadr’s Charter rights and that’s why Conservatives brought him back to Canada.

Many folks believe that Omar Khadr’s pursuit of this matter through the courts since his return to Canada is a measure of his lack of gratitude and continued feeling of contempt for western values. The secret nature of Justin Trudeau’s deal may thwart legal efforts to ensure Khadr is required to pay any money to his victim’s widow and two children.

Many consider Trudeau’s choice as an act of disrespect to the men and women in Canada’s military, and the nations and military personnel allied with Canada. Together, we fight terrorism and our military personnel face incredible danger every day in this on-going battle. When a Canadian soldier is killed or injured in battle, the Government of Canada provides a lump sum payment up to a maximum of $360,000. Despite this, the Liberal government is willing to provide millions of dollars and apologize to a convicted terrorist who actively sought to kill Canadian and allied soldiers.

Our thoughts continue to be with Christopher Speer’s widow and family, who must relive their ordeal every time this issue comes up in the media. Given Mr. Khadr’s admission of guilt, Conservatives are calling on him to give any settlement money to Sergeant Speer`s family.

Trudeau claims that when the Chretien-Martin Liberal governments violated Khadr’s Charter rights, “we all end up paying for it”. He is saying that his father’s Charter implies all Canadians share in the guilt of the Chretien-Martin governments, so all Canadians must pay. As Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau made sure Canadians paid millions of taxpayer dollars and apologized to the convicted terrorist whose Charter rights were violated. The vast majority of Canadians continue to think this is wrong

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