Dressed in white coveralls

Community rally to boost fundraising efforts to paint Stettler’s historic elevator

In an effort to paint the 93-year-old Stettler P&H Elevator, a rally is planned for next Thursday, Aug. 1, to promote the project.

In an effort to paint the 93-year-old Stettler P&H Elevator, a rally is planned for next Thursday, Aug. 1, to promote the project.

A community barbecue is planned for noon that day and tours will be given through 3 p.m. to bring attention to the need to refurbish the towering and historic elevator.

Local dignitaries, including MLA Rick Strankman, plan to attend, organizers said.

Seniors such as Evelyn Shursen and Joyce Gordon are optimistic that, with strong community support, Stettler P&H Elevator Preservation Society will reach the goal of $60,000 to recoat the building operated by Parrish and Heimbecker grain company.

About $25,000 is already in the bank in support of the project.

“We’re going to make people aware of the need to raise money to help preserve this building,” Shursen said.

During the day, the elevator site will be open as the society invites the community to support one of Alberta’s oldest standing elevators and a time of fun and food.

“We rely on donations, small and large, and volunteers,” Gordon said.

“We need to make this happen.”

A former longtime school teacher, Shursen encourages all her students to get on board and support the project.

“I challenge all my former students to support the project,” said Shursen, who taught at Stettler Junior High School for more than 30 years until she retired in 1995.

Built in 1920, the structure has become a towering icon for visitors, as is stands beside the home station for Alberta Prairie Railway Excursions.

“It’s a great opportunity to promote tourism and history,” said Shursen. “Tourists see the value of preserving this with their support of funds and donations.”

Gordon said this elevator is important to preserve to help tell of the story of Stettler and early life in Canada for younger generation.

“They need to know our history,” Gordon said.

Shursen has deep roots and vivid memories of the Stettler elevator.

“The history of grain from the elevator was so prevalent in the early history of Stettler,” Shursen said.

“My father and my grandfather brought grain to Stettler to be shipped out around the world and the grain was made into feed for cattle, chickens and pigs.”


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